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Tuesday, 27 August 2019 00:00

Foot Changes That Can Occur in Pregnancy

There are numerous changes a woman’s body goes through while being pregnant. The feet are often affected, and obvious differences can be noticed. These can include swelling, chronic aching, and muscle cramps. It is helpful to buy shoes that fit correctly, and the best time to accomplish this is later in the day when the feet are at their largest. It is important to choose shoes that have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, as this can help to prevent unwanted foot conditions from developing. When the feet become swollen, many women find mild relief when the feet are elevated, in addition to performing gentle foot stretches. If you would like additional information on how to have your feet feel better during pregnancy, please consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with one of our podiatrists from Westfield Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Westfield and Newark, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Pregnancy and Foot Health
Monday, 19 August 2019 00:00

Symptoms and Causes of Poor Circulation

Your circulation system is responsible for sending blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The most common causes of poor circulation are obesity, diabetes, heart conditions and arterial issues. Symptoms of poor circulation include tingling, numbness, pain and muscle cramps. Blood clots and varicose veins are two internal issues that lead to poor circulation. Blood clots block the flow of blood either partially or entirely. If discovered too late, blood clots can prove to be deadly, as they can lead to stroke and even death in severe cases. Varicose veins are enlarged veins caused by valve failure. This causes the veins to be unable to move blood as efficiently which will make it very hard for the blood to circulate. Luckily, there are some ways that poor circulation can be treated and diagnosed. It can be diagnosed through a physical exam, blood sugar test for diabetes, ultrasound or CT scan, blood pressure test or antibody blood test. Some treatments include compression socks for painful, swollen feet and ankles, special exercise programs to increase circulation, medications such as blood thinners, and different clot-dissolving drugs. It is recommended to go see your podiatrist if you are experiencing any of the symptoms or have a condition that is known to be associated with poor circulation.


 

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Westfield Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Westfield and Newark, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Tuesday, 06 August 2019 00:00

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

A broken toe can occur if something heavy is dropped on it, or if you stub it by hitting it against a piece of furniture. Common symptoms that are often associated with this condition can include bruising near and around the affected toe, and there may also be difficulty in walking and putting weight on it. If the toe appears to be bent at an awkward angle, it may be dislocated, and immediate medical attention should be sought. It may also look swollen, and it may be hard to move. After a proper diagnosis is performed, which typically consists of having an X-ray taken, the correct treatment can begin. Many patients find it beneficial to use the method that is known as buddy taping. This is accomplished by taping the injured toe to the toe next to it. This method may be helpful in providing adequate support as the healing process begins. If the fracture is severe enough, then surgery may be necessary to repair the injured toe. If you think you may have broken your toe, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who can offer the correct treatment options.

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Westfield Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Westfield and Newark, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment. 

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