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Wednesday, 15 August 2018 00:00

Your feet are covered a good part of the day. If you are diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often another sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 14 August 2018 00:00

The middle part of the foot typically consists of a curved structure known as the arch. For patients who have flat feet, the arch is absent and the foot lies completely flat on the ground. In babies, the arches are not always visible and will become more apparent as the child ages. Certain people may experience pain in the feet and ankles as a result of having flat feet. Additionally, shoes may wear out faster than the average person, because of the inward rolling that may occur. The bones and muscles in the feet may become weaker as well, which may affect the overall health of the body. Research has shown there may be several causes of fallen arches, including rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, or muscle and nerve conditions such as cerebral palsy. Moderate relief may be found in wearing shoes that fit well and offer adequate support, in addition to performing mild stretching techniques that may aid in strengthening the muscles and surrounding ligaments and tendons. It’s strongly advised to consult with a podiatrist if you are afflicted with flat feet and would like additional information about treatment options.

Flatfoot

Flatfoot is a condition that occurs when the arches on the foot are flattened, which allows the soles of the feet to touch the floor. Flatfoot is a common condition and it is usually painless.

Throughout childhood, most people begin to develop arches in their feet, however, some do not. Those who do not develop arches are left with flatfoot. The pain associated with flat feet is usually at its worse when engaging in activity. Another symptom that may occur with those who have this condition is swelling along the inside of the ankle.

It is also possible to have flexible flatfoot. Flexible flatfoot occurs when the arch is visible while sitting or standing on the tiptoes, but it disappears when standing. People who have flexible flatfoot are often children and most outgrow it without any problems.

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop flatfoot. Those who have diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk of flatfoot development. Other factors include aging and obesity.

Diagnosis for flat feet is usually done by a series of tests by your podiatrist. Your podiatrist will typically try an x-ray, CT scan, ultrasound, or MRI on the feet. Treatment is usually not necessary for flat foot unless it causes pain. However, therapy is often used for those who experience pain in their flat feet. Some other suggested treatment options are arch supports, stretching exercises, and supportive shoes. 

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Monday, 06 August 2018 00:00

Recent research has shown that approximately 30 to 40 percent of seniors fall at least once per year. Many injuries may occur from the unnatural act of falling, including breaking a foot or spraining an ankle, in addition to possibly affecting the overall health of the body. There are simple steps that may be implemented to avoid falling, and as a result, the chances of a serious fall from occurring may be diminished. It’s important to choose shoes that fit correctly and it is beneficial if they have a non-slip sole. For those seniors who exercise regularly, their strong muscles and tendons may aid in providing the necessary strength to prevent a fall from occurring. Additionally, living in a clean and uncluttered environment may help older people to walk without tripping. It may be helpful to obtain regular medical checkups, which may include an eye exam and a reevaluation of any medications that are taken.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Westfield Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Westfield and Newark, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 30 July 2018 00:00

Recent research has indicated there may be a direct link between increased body mass index, which is also referred to as BMI, and serious foot conditions. People who have an elevated BMI may develop foot ailments, which may include arthritis, heel pain, or tendonitis. Pressure is generally increased in the ankles and feet as a result of the additional weight and this may lead to the feet incurring skeletal issues. Additionally, it may be challenging to purchase shoes that are comfortable, while offering adequate support. There may be ways to find relief from foot pain associated with obesity, which may include practicing a healthy dietary lifestyle change, in addition to including moderate exercise into your daily routine. A consultation with a podiatrist may be considered for a proper assessment of any foot conditions that may be present, in addition to learning about how to reduce your BMI, which may possibly prevent future problems with your feet.

The more you weigh, the harder your feet must work to support your body. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Westfield Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and your Feet

People who are overweight are putting more pressure on their ankles, knees, and hips as well as their feet. This unfortunately can lead to variety of different issues.

Problems & Complications Stemming from Obesity

  • When the body is overweight, it tries to compensate by changing the way that it moves. An obese person may lean forward and put extra weight on the wrong part of the foot. This puts unnecessary stress on the feet.
  • Obese people are also more likely to develop type II diabetes which is a condition that causes a lot of foot problems. People with diabetes often don’t feel the cuts and sores that they may have on their feet, which can lead to more complicated and severe issues.
  • Plantar fasciitis is another foot condition that can be caused by obesity. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, which causes pain and stiffness while walking and climbing stairs.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Westfield and Newark, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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